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Moving? Get Exactly What You Want!

by Judy Reed

Ready For An Empty Nest?

by Judy Reed

Many homeowners today face a serious housing dilemma. They love their home, its location, and even their neighbors. But they’ve outgrown the space. Do they trade up to a bigger or better house, thus entering a busy real estate market, or stay put and renovate?

Most homeowners have never sold and bought at the same time, nor have they lived through a renovation. Both experiences are incredibly stressful, and many people don’t know what to expect. Here are some tips for making an informed decision.

Know what you’re getting into

It’s helpful to know that it is cheaper to stay in your current home and renovate than it is to sell your home and buy a bigger one. And renovating isn’t as big a deal as one may think.

If you go into it with an open mind and full awareness, it’s not so bad. However, some people are just not cut out for living with dust, disruption, and a little bit of chaos.

Living through a renovation means a constant stress is hanging over you. If you can’t take that in your life, don’t fool yourself.

Check your finances

The most important thing you need to do is understand your home financial situation. Do you have equity in your home? If so, how much, and would you need those funds to either renovate or purchase the new home?

Is a home equity line of credit available to you? Using that money provides the mortgage tax benefit for the interest, which makes an equity line a no-brainer.

What would you need to spend on a new home in your desired location? Just like when you first got pre-approved to purchase the original home, you need to get pre-approved and run the numbers. You may find that the house you can get isn’t much bigger than where you are, or that you have to change areas to get more space.

Define your renovation requirements

What exactly is it that you need? An extra bedroom or bath, more family or community space, a larger kitchen or a master bath? Put it all out there and prioritize.

Can these changes be made within the envelope of your current home, or would you have to expand outside your walls? Renovating inside might mean that you need to leave the home for some time, while an expansion might allow you to stay in the home during the renovation.

Research zoning and building codes

Learn how building and zoning laws will affect your plan to renovate. Find out if expansion is even a possibility.

Many people think that finishing the basement is as easy as putting up some walls and carpet and moving the TV downstairs. But did you know that you likely need two forms of egress or certain height and insulation to make a finished basement meet code? A few hours of an architect’s time can help get you the information you need.

If you want to add on, make sure that your lot is big enough. Town zoning laws only allow a certain percentage of the lot to be covered. If you’re at your max, you’re out of luck.

Set-back laws might mean that you can only expand in the front or on one side of the property. You may find out immediately that what you want to do simply isn’t possible, and the decision is made for you.

Don’t over-do for the neighborhood

You need a master bathroom and family room or some extra square footage, but will the neighborhood support it? You don’t want to be the biggest or best house on the block when you go to sell. A big master suite or designer kitchen may be just what you want, but will future buyers pay for it?

Do some research, talk to a The Judy Reed Team and attend open houses in your neighborhood. If you don’t know, ask. But do not embark on a large renovation project if you can’t get your money back when it’s time to sell.

A different kind of stress if you move

Purchasing a new home and selling your existing one simultaneously means instant stress that is intense and compacted in a short period. The stress may come in the form of carrying two mortgages, getting a bridge loan or waiting for your home to get an offer.

Remember how you felt when you purchased your first home? Now double or even triple that.

Expect the expenses

When you sell your home, you need to pay the real estate commission and transfer tax on the sale, and you may be taxed on any gain. When you get a mortgage for the new home, expect more loan and title fees upfront.

While many closing costs and transfer fees are tax deductible, you don’t realize anything from these expenses. The $10,000 in fees might be better spent toward a new bathroom. Before you decide to explore this path, gather some information about costs.

Deciding whether to trade up or sell and buy is incredibly personal. The most obvious thing to do is to check your finances, and see what is out there on the purchase market. Learn what’s happening and understand how you would fare. And even if it’s intimidating, seriously consider renovating. It is incredibly rewarding to be able to make your home even more custom to you.

How Does the Color of Your Home Affect Buyers?

by Judy Reed

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It’s no secret that color is crucial when marketing a product. In fact, consumers come to a subconscious conclusion about a product within 90 seconds of viewing, and much of that judgment (62-90 percent) is based solely on color, according to the Institute for Color Research. Retailers apply these findings every day (think red sale signs) to encourage consumers to purchase their products. Can the same be said in real estate?
 

Consider this: If color influences product marketing strategies, the color of a home can be a decisive factor when selling.


“Your home’s exterior color is literally the first thing a buyer will see and comment on,” says Suzanne Otto, home stager and owner of Six Twenty Designs in Montgomery County, Pa. When preparing a home for the market, Otto recommends shades within the white, tan or gray color families. These colors resonate beyond pure aesthetics – according to e-commerce giant eBay, white indicates safety. For a homebuyer, a home with a white exterior can translate to concepts like “shelter” or “safe haven.”


Similarly, understated browns (including the aforementioned tan) signal security. Homes painted in sandy or mushroom hues read comfort and warmth. Colors like taupe, which falls somewhere between brown and gray, call to mind traditional values, homeownership included. Earthy tones like laurel green or artichoke can not only highlight a verdant landscape, but also evoke a sense of tranquility.
 

Per eBay’s assessment, blue is ideal to move product because it transcends culture. Homes outfitted with a dusty blue or blue-gray exterior may not bridge the gap between your everyday seller and an international homebuyer, but a universally regarded color can help widen the net for buyers on the home front.
 

If red signs boost retail sales, it seems likely a red home would be ideal for a speedy sale. Not necessarily – red in small doses, such as sale stickers or tags, encourages action. Red on a grander scale can cause adverse reactions. An alizarin crimson door, for instance, might be well-received by buyers, but a house in the same shade could potentially limit offers.
 

Homes in other colors can sell successfully – our retinas tend to register yellow before any other color, so a buttery yellow exterior could be an attractive option for buyers – but non-traditional colors, like oranges and purples, appeal to very specific personalities and can significantly shrink the pool of interested buyers.

It’s important for sellers to consider the home in relation to the neighborhood before swapping out the exterior color or refreshing an existing paint job. Do nearby homes share a distinct color scheme? Is each home uniquely colored? Evaluating the home’s surroundings can help sellers determine what’s most popular in their market.

 
 

RE/MAX vs The Industry

by Judy Reed

Quick Ways To Turn Off Buyers: YOUR SELLING CHEAT SHEET!

by Judy Reed

4 Ways to Tell How Fast Your Home Will Sell

by Judy Reed

for sale

It’s not just location, location, location — although location is certainly important. Lots of other factors make one house hot and another one not.

Here are data-driven pointers from Zillow Research that help identify which homes are likely to fly off the market (in 60 days or less):

  • Keep calm and price it right. The housing market is improving, but take care not to overheat your listing price. Homes priced more than 12 percent above their Zestimate® home values are almost half as likely to sell in 60 days as those priced closer to their estimated values. The sweet spot is between the Zestimate and six percent above it — a range where homes sell about as quickly as those priced below their Zestimates.
  • Take a picture, but not too many. The optimal number of listing photos is 16 to 21, but it’s better to have too many than too few. Having fewer than nine photos lowers your chances of selling in 60 days by two percentage points.
  • Size matters. As a rule, smaller homes (under 1,100 square feet nationally) sell the fastest — about nine percentage points faster than the largest homes in a 60-day window — but that doesn’t hold true for all markets. In San Francisco and Indianapolis, for example, small homes take the longest to sell.
  • Get the word out. Page views on Zillow are a strong indicator of how quickly a home will sell. Listings with 280 or more page views in the first week were three times as likely to sell in 60 days as those with fewer than 100 views. That’s powerful incentive to make sure your agent spreads the word early by posting your listing online.

Top 3 Reasons To Use Energy Star Approved Products

by Judy Reed

Ready For An Empty Nest?

by Judy Reed

Before you start going to open houses, pay down high interest debt now.

The higher the interest, the higher your priority should be in getting it squared up quickly. Many people pay close to the minimum on their credit card debt in favor of growing their savings, despite the fact that their payment often doesn’t even cover interest. Monthly interest for credit cards for people with near perfect credit can still hover around ten percent or more, often double or triple your student loan payments.

buy-house-student-debtPay down your cards as quickly as you can, and only use them in an emergency situation. With this extra interest-payment savings, you can pay additionally on your student loans, lessening their overall burden, or tuck away money for a down payment. This will improve your credit score too, helping you get better terms on your loan.

Be mindful of your Debt-to-Income ratio.

One of the biggest factors for people who can’t get a loan despite having a good job and some savings is their DTI, or Debt-to-Income ratio. Lenders study your monthly income compared to how much you spend paying down debts such as your loan payments, credit cards, auto loans and any other installment or revolving debt.

This is among the biggest hurdles for people with student loan debt in getting loans. Look into where your DTI is early in the process so you know how far away you are from securing good terms on a loan, then make actionable steps toward that goal before you sit down with a lender.

Investigate down payment assistance programs.

Chances are if you are making payments towards your student debt, you aren’t putting a large amount of money aside for your down payment. Many young people who have smaller savings look immediately to FHA loans, but especially in high dollar metros in places like California or New York, your FHA standard 3.5 percent can still cost tens of thousands of dollars (plus, many have higher interest rates and require mortgage insurance).

Every state and many cities have programs in place to assist qualifying homebuyers in paying their down payment. Whether they’re helping first time buyers or stabilizing neighborhoods, down payment assistance programs can be a great help to buyers whose savings have been affected by their debt load.

Consider crowdsourcing.

Sometimes the needs of the market lead people to innovate in ways wholly unfamiliar to generations before them. For our parents’ generation, signaling a stranger to drive you around was called hitchhiking; for our generation, we call it Uber.

The same type of dynamic exists in financing your investment. If you’re starting out with debt, getting more people on board or looking for a different way to kick off your investment can lessen the initial weight you carry. Alternative approaches to financing, from crowdsourcing collectives and co-ops to pitching in with trustworthy friends to get off the ground, are becoming more popular as the cost of buying a home increases in major metros.

Other alternative financing strategies such as buying owner-financed homes, rent-to-own and developing vacant land are also growing in popularity among creative youngsters looking to get started sooner rather than later.

Distressed properties.

Swing a hammer like your grandpa did. Chances are, if you are a young and indebted person with limited assets to work from, a distressed property that needs some renovation will be more in your range than a new or updated turnkey home. Do what you can yourself to save money on contractors. Remember to consider the cost of your renovation and the degree of repair that is needed; the cost of contractors can vary widely from region to region based on demand and availability.

first-propertyBuy wisely.

Above all, buy a home that is going to make you money, not just the one you can afford. Thanks to advances in real estate data, we are learning more and more new things about the types of trends that appeal to different buyer demographics. Buying a home with a higher walk score, for example, can boost your rate of appreciation more than homes in car-reliant neighborhoods according to several studies.

Know about buyer trends and get a home that will earn you money in the long term, rather than trigger migraines. People whose lending options are limited may feel pressured to aim lower on the quality and location of the home they invest in for obvious reasons, but often it’s better to wait than buy an unmarketable property.

With time and patience, young people who are still paying off their education can get started on buying a home. Growing an investment with a moderate student debt burden requires preparation, but it can be done — and done successfully!

If done right, buying an investment property can provide you with the type of financial security that even makes it possible to pay off your debts more quickly than expected.

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 29

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